With the advent of the space age in 1957, controls design, particularly in the United States, turned away from the frequency-domain techniques of classical control theory and backed into the differential equation techniques of the late 19th century, which were couched in the time domain. During the 1940s and 1950s, German mathematician Irmgard Flugge-Lotz developed the theory of discontinuous automatic control, which became widely used in hysteresis control systems such as navigation systems, fire-control systems, and electronics. Through Flugge-Lotz and others, the modern era saw time-domain design for nonlinear systems (1961), navigation (1960), optimal control and estimation theory (1962), nonlinear control theory (1969), digital control and filtering theory (1974), and the personal computer (1983).

Automation of homes and home appliances is also thought to impact the environment, but the benefits of these features are also questioned. A study of energy consumption of automated homes in Finland showed that smart homes could reduce energy consumption by monitoring levels of consumption in different areas of the home and adjusting consumption to reduce energy leaks (such as automatically reducing consumption during the nighttime when activity is low). This study, along with others, indicated that the smart home’s ability to monitor and adjust consumption levels would reduce unnecessary energy usage. However, new research suggests that smart homes might not be as efficient as non-automated homes. A more recent study has indicated that, while monitoring and adjusting consumption levels does decrease unnecessary energy use, this process requires monitoring systems that also consume a significant amount of energy. This study suggested that the energy required to run these systems is so much so that it negates any benefits of the systems themselves, resulting in little to no ecological benefit.[54]
Lors de la rédaction de son étude comparative sur les outils d’automatisation de tests fonctionnels, Osaxis a été amenée à utiliser et décortiquer un certain nombre d’outils permettant d’automatiser les tests par pilotage de l’interface graphique. Une fonctionnalité présente dans la quasi-totalité de ces logiciels est la gestion du référentiel d’objets. Par différentes approches, chaque éditeur propose des opérations plus ou moins complexes qui vont de la visualisation des objets présents dans le référentiel jusqu’à la création d’objets personnalisés.
Les boutons « Play » exécuteront votre bot, à partir de l’action que vous avez sélectionnée. Le premier bouton de lecture lance uniquement l’action sélectionnée. Le second bouton de lecture fonctionnera jusqu’ à ce que le bot finisse avec succès, rencontre une erreur ou atteigne un point de rupture. Les points de rupture sont la façon dont vous définissez où arrêter le robot pendant le test. Pour assigner un point d’arrêt, il suffit de cliquer avec le bouton droit sur une action.
Lors d’un précédent article sur le blog, l’outil libre Selenium était présenté. Selenium utilise une autre approche en faisant référence aux objets d’une page Web directement dans le script de tests (par l’intermédiaire des propriétés et attributs des balises HTML). Il n’existe pas dans Selenium d’outil donnant accès à la liste des objets présents ni permettant leur paramétrage, c’est à dire de véritable référentiel d’objets exploitable.
I’ve used other automation tools besides VBA. Ubot and iMacros are both excellent, and powerful programs (their own programming languages, really). In some respects they’re easier, and for 99% of web automation tasksg, you really can’t go wrong with either. But I got to where I only used VBA because my programming was getting into Windows API’s and command line calls (Visual Basic is tightly integrated with Windows), plus I often found myself using Excel alongside these programs anyway. I discovered there’s almost nothing VBA can’t do with automating Windows and Internet Explorer (even making IE appear as a different browser), and it seemed to me investing time learning Microsoft’s Visual Basic programming language just made more sense.
×