But the code wants to run all at once, in a millisecond. By the time IE actually loads the page of search results, the entire subroutine is long over. We have to slow things down and wait for the browser while its navigating. We could use something like Application.Wait(Now + TimeValue("00:00:05")) to wait 5 seconds, but if the page loads faster we’re wasting time waiting for nothing, and if the page takes longer we’re in the same pickle as before. Do While objIE.Busy = True Or objIE.readyState <> 4: DoEvents: Loop is an elegant Do...Loop solution consisting of 3 VBA statements we’ve tidied up on one line, using colons (:) to connect them. It’s saying: while IE is busy navigating, just sit here and run in circles. objIE.Busy = True and objIE.readyState <> 4 (<> means not equal) are essentially the same thing –one could probably be ommitted– but just to make sure the page is really done loading we make both of these conditions requirements for getting out of the loop, by using the logical operator Or. The DoEvents part is technically not needed but we add it in the loop to free up processing resources and allow other things to happen within Excel during this time, asynchronous to the running loop. For the over-achievers out there, here are some other ways we could have written this line of code to do the same thing.

An early development of sequential control was relay logic, by which electrical relays engage electrical contacts which either start or interrupt power to a device. Relays were first used in telegraph networks before being developed for controlling other devices, such as when starting and stopping industrial-sized electric motors or opening and closing solenoid valves. Using relays for control purposes allowed event-driven control, where actions could be triggered out of sequence, in response to external events. These were more flexible in their response than the rigid single-sequence cam timers. More complicated examples involved maintaining safe sequences for devices such as swing bridge controls, where a lock bolt needed to be disengaged before the bridge could be moved, and the lock bolt could not be released until the safety gates had already been closed.


Dans le chapitre « Le machinisme au xxe siècle »  : […] Depuis la Première Guerre mondiale, et surtout depuis la Seconde, le machinisme est passé de la mécanique classique à l'automatisation, c'est-à-dire à la création de machines où il n'y a plus aucune intervention humaine, surveillance et réparations exceptées. Cela a été rendu possible par une utilisation généralisée de l'électronique, par des […] Lire la suite☛ http://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/machinisme/#i_2513
Here we reserve aEle as a different type of object variable. Specifically, we early bind it for use as a webpage link (the tags on a webpage). The other way would be to declare it more generically as Dim aEle as Object then later put it to use in one or more specific roles as an object — either way works. Once again, I could choose to call it anything, even mySuperHrefThingy, but I like the simplicity of aEle because it’s short and makes me think element.
La bonne application du paramétrage peut être vérifiée avec l’explorateur d’objet de TestPartner. Cette fenêtre donne, pour une application donnée, l’organisation des différents composants la constituant. On découvre dans l’arbre, les deux objets dont les propriétés de reconnaissance ont été adaptées. Encadré en bleu, le bouton « Description » est ainsi reconnu en tant que tel et est différencié du bouton « Retour », encadré en vert :
Dans le chapitre « Assemblage des fragments  »  : […] de la bio-informatique est l'aide à la « mise en forme » des génomes de grande taille. En effet, grâce aux apports de la robotique, le biologiste peut désormais séquencer des génomes complets. Toutefois, la technologie des robots ne permet pas de traiter plus de 700 nucléotides sur un seul fragment d'ADN à la fois : le génome est donc découpé, au […] Lire la suite☛ http://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/biologie-la-bio-informatique/#i_2513
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